Glutamine Intolerance

 

Dr. Kasia Kines, Nutritionist, CEO and founder of EBV Educational Institute
Seattle offices at 6016 NE Bothell Way, Suite G, Kenmore, WA 98028
Virtual clinic serving the US and globally
support@kasiakines.com

In this video, I describe an unusual situation that may happen when you use l-glutamine for your gastrointestinal needs, e.g. for leaky gut recovery- when you actually become reactive to this otherwise very safe amino acid. Why would that be? It is highly unusual, but it has happened enough times in my practice to look into it, which I did for you here! The video goes into the details of it for you and tells you what to do with it. The solutions are remarkably simple.

When working with complicated gastro-intestinal patients, I use glutamine as an essential part of the protocol for the recovery of the gastrointestinal tract, and for good reasons. L-glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the body, readily available. It is the main source of nutrients for enterocytes, the cells lining your intestines, and your body can make it. But we also call it conditionally-essential because in certain situations such as trauma or burns glutamine levels drop severely, the body cannot make enough, and in extreme cases that can even lead to death.

Clinicians generally use as much 25g l-glutamine a day if needed, and I present you with research behind the safety levels. Interestingly, glutamine is needed not only for the gut, but also for the muscles, the lungs and even your brain!!!! So the needs are quite high. If all nutrients are in place, glutamine helps form GABA, the neurotransmitter of calm and happiness. When GABA is deficient, you experience anxiety fear, brain fog, insomnia, so of course you want a steady level of GABA.

Enjoy the video to get a walk through this fascinating topic!

Dr. Kasia Kines, Nutritionist, CEO and founder of EBV Educational Institute
Seattle offices at 6016 NE Bothell Way, Suite G, Kenmore, WA 98028
Virtual clinic serving the US and globally
support@kasiakines.com

2 Comments

  1. Posted on January 28, 2017 at 12:34 PM by Candice

    I have been looking for the answer to this for months! I think it is one of my key issues. I do not tolerate more than 2.5g of l glutamine and I am wondering if I could tolerate collagen powder or bone broth. I hate to use trial and error. Should I avoid bone broth and collagen powder for now?

  2. Kasia Kines

    Posted on January 28, 2017 at 2:35 PM by Kasia Kines

    I would do testing first, for GAD, for magnesium level, for B6 level, etc., so that the body can use glutamine from whatever sources. Try collagen or even better gelatin and see how you do. πŸ™‚

LEAVE A COMMENT

In less than a week the most troubling issues were resolved.~ Jason